A better translated experience in the civic space

Nov 11, 2016 | Case Studies, Government

Community meetings, town halls, and other events organized by local and federal government strive to provide captioning and translation to individuals in accordance with federal law. But often times this requires two weeks advance notice and can be costly. It may also require extra audio equipment, setup, and preparation. If the organizers are unable to find translators for the event, the attendees might have to settle for less or no translation at all.

What if there was a better, more convenient way to communicate with the community?

Enter spf.io. With the preparation already being done, leaders can provide a great translated experience to attendees in the community. These attendees can also participate and speak for themselves in the community meetings. All that is needed is a microphone connected to a computer logged into spf.io.

It’s a big job to bring together and serve the community. Spf.io is here to make it easier to communicate and engage with them.

Ready to try it out?

Contact us to start reaching your multilingual audience better than ever before.

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